The YES! Name Game

The YES! Name Game

One of the reasons it’s so strange to do a presentation without any audience feedback is the lack of energy exchange. So much of performing or presenting “live” is the give and take of energy between the audience and the performer. This is one of the reasons we love to perform for kids. The energy created by a room full of laughing children could light New York City for a week!

Yes unicycle

Laughter creates positive energy. 

But you don’t have to be Jerry Seinfeld or Sponge Bob to shift the energy in a room. 

Whenever we do a workshop we always start with the 

YES! Name Game because it’s the perfect way to completely energize a group. 

It’s also a fun way to break the ice and get to know the names of participants. 

This is a great game to for classrooms, scouts, camps, library programs, birthday parties, etc. It works well for a large group, but it can also be done with as little as three or four children. We’ve done it with young kids, tweens, teens and even adults. 

Try starting off your next board meeting or PTA program with this exercise and see how much more you get accomplished.

The directions for the game are below along with several variations. We’ve also included a video. Yes! Yes! Yes!

 

Creative Literacy - Yes! Name Game
Creative Literacy – Yes! Name Game

Directions:

1. Everyone stands in a circle or in big group facing forward.  

2. The leader says his/her name while doing a simple movement for example: touching an elbow to the opposite knee.

3. The entire group says, “Yes!” while pumping fists and elbows into body (classic “yes” move).

4. Then the group repeats that person’s name and movement.

5. The entire group says, “Yes!” again while pumping elbows and fists into body.

6. Move on to the next person and repeat.

7. When everyone has had a turn or when you’ve gone through 10-15 people, everyone says, “Yes!” three times with the elbow pump then applauds.

 

Pirate Variation: Instead of saying, “Yes!” Say, “Argggh!”

Dream Big Variation: Instead of saying your name, say what you want to be when you grow up (along with a movement).  

Around the World Variation: Say someplace you’d like to visit. 

Narnia Variation: Say an imaginary location from a book or movie. 

Experiment with different variations: Colors, Animals, Songs, Movie Titles, Etc.

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